News

The 65,000 sf Wooster Science Building Renovation has been awarded on budget for 27 Million Dollars


Working closely with the New York State University Construction Fund and SUNY New Paltz campus, Croxton Collaborative ¦ NK Architects has achieved the complete transformation of an obsolete 1968 cast-in-place concrete structure into a state-of-the art Multipurpose Academic Building. The high-performance exterior envelope and all-new mechanical systems, deep daylighting and AV/IT integration have been designed within the context of an overall seismic structural upgrade. The building now anchors the center of the campus by interconnecting the two major Academic Quads and creates a series of exterior and interior social interaction spaces along the new circulation pathways. The $27M, 65,000 SF project was awarded as designed, without value engineering : on-budget. Construction commenced in the Summer of 2012 and is scheduled for completion in the Fall of 2014.

The overall program includes Academic and Faculty spaces for the Departments of Psychology, Anthropology and Engineering which are organized on the upper two floors with Student Services and Food Service Facilities primarily at the first floor. Interconnecting these levels are daylit atria which are interspersed with student lounges and breakout spaces. Significant programmatic savings were realized during Programming Phase by analyzing common patterns of support space usage thereby achieving higher utilization of fewer, but higher quality spaces. A ‘Help Desk’ concept streamlines Student Services operations and, in combination with programmatic strategies achieved a 25% reduction in the total Net Space requirement within the Group.

To learn more about this project, please visit: The New Paltz website


Headquarters for Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities Wins Best Eco-Friendly Project at 2012 Saudi Arabian Building and Infrastructure Summit

The Headquarters for the Saudi Commission for Tourism and Antiquities, also known as the "Business Oasis Center" was selected as the Best Eco Friendly Project during the 2nd Annual Saudi Arabian Building and Infrastructure Summit (SABIS), which was hosted under the patronage of His Excellency Abdul Rahman Ali Al-Jeraisy, Chairman, Riyadh Chamber of Commerce, Vice Chairman, Council of Saudi Chambers of Commerce and Industry.

The 250,000 sf Headquarters, located in the Diplomatic Quarter of Riyadh, and designed by Croxton Collaborative Architects, as the result of the firm’s winning proposal in an international design competition, has been completed jointly with the Riyadh-based firm of Saud Consult.

The awards, also known as the Saudi BuildInfra Awards, have become an integral part of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's Construction Industry, celebrating the remarkable achievements of the successful Projects. The award ceremony is organized to fulfill a need to provide role models for overall excellence in execution of projects and its impact on the economy and honors entities for their efforts and performance.

Featuring multiple sustainable design elements, including a free standing lattice, which serves the role of exterior shading (without the massive thermal bridging effect typical of such façade elements), the Headquarters is fully daylighted and serves as an exemplar of sustainable design in Saudi Arabia.

To learn more about the awards, please visit: The SABIS website


NRDC Green Roof Project Wins $485,000 Green Infrastrcture Grant from NYC Department of Environmental Conservation

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Carter Strickland recently awarded $4.6 million in grants to community-based green infrastructure projects that will improve the water quality of New York Harbor by reducing combined sewer overflows. The winners of the Green Infrastructure Grant Program represent a key component of the NYC Green Infrastructure Plan – launched by Mayor Bloomberg in 2010 to support PlaNYC’s goals for improved waterways.

Yet another accomplishment in the ongoing collaboration between Croxton Collaborative Architects and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), the project at the NRDC headquarters building, located within the East River watershed, proposed a green roof system that includes native plantings and a plot for fruits and vegetables maintained and harvested by NRDC staff. There will be a viewing platform for visitors to see the green roof, trees, rainwater collection system, beehives, and solar panels. NRDC is providing $346,040 in matching funds for this project.

"We're delighted that the roof of the NRDC building in Chelsea will soon host plots of native plants, flowers for our resident bees and a demonstration of urban agriculture," said Anthony Guerrero, Director of Facilities and Administration for NRDC. "Partnering with the NYC Department of Environmental Protection to expand our green roof infrastructure will help NRDC deliver on its goal of advancing sustainable green living for our community and our world."

To read the official press release, please visit:
NYC Department of Environmental Conservation



NRDC Headquarters Expansion Prototype Featured on Cover of High Performing Buildings

The recently completed Office Expansion Prototype at NRDC’s New York City Headquarters has been featured on the cover of ASHRAE's High Performing Buildings . The project, the most recent chapter in the 25-year collaboration between Croxton Collaborative Architects and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), creates a more sustainable, flexible universal office plan that increases occupant density while improving well-being. And, with 51 of 59 points achieved on its recent LEED-CI Platinum certification, it has received the highest LEED-CI rating ever!

Focusing on both organizations’ emphasis on resourcefulness the project was one of the first on the East Coast to utilize Integrated Project Delivery (IPD). The resulting project was 7.5% under budget and had only 2 change orders.

Energy efficiency was a key project goal. A high efficiency HVAC unit was installed, the lighting design was tuned to minimize energy usage (31% more efficient than code) while maintaining productive light levels, and a thermal upgrade/retrofit was performed via environmentally benign insulation plus high performance glazing. Daylight was maximized through optimized ceiling geometries, high reflectance surfaces, dual-zone daylighting control and incorporating a daylight responsive continuous dimming system. Energy modeling confirms 32% more energy efficiency than required by code.

Indoor air quality (IAQ) was thoroughly addressed by the specification of low/no VOC materials, materials with no added urea formaldehyde, low emitting carpet, and high efficiency filtration of ventilation air. Post-construction IAQ testing confirmed contaminant concentrations orders of magnitude below USGBC ‘green’ thresholds for good indoor air quality.

To read the article online, please visit:
High Performing Buildings Spring 2012



Randy Croxton To Lead Executive Education Seminar at Harvard

2012 continues to confirm the ‘new normal’: higher levels of competition and greater expectations of performance and quality. At national and international levels, the ability to frame the project’s concept and design excellence as inherently high performance, resourceful and sustainable continues to be a winning strategy. Now that USGBC’s LEED and other green building models have been widely adopted across the profession, there is an even greater competitive advantage to the architect who captures the unique performance potentials of client mission and site which cannot be identified in the universal and non-site specific green model.

While models of green architecture performance have had success in raising awareness and changing the marketplace for the better (USGBC's LEED program being the foremost example), there is an increasing demand for higher energy performance, robust materials screening, and a dramatically more resourceful architecture, landscape, and community response. New sustainability models have emerged that incorporate a range of next generation attributes, including specific community and urban contexts, wayfinding, infrastructure, outdoor environmental comfort, and sustainable-transition planning to reach 100 percent renewable energy and net zero energy. The key to remaining competitive as a firm or learning organization, attracting grant funding, and keeping a project current over the typically multiyear process of design and construction is to participate in the evolution of the field and understand how future expectations are already shaping the market.

For the eighteenth consecutive year, Randy Croxton will lead an executive education seminar at the Harvard Graduate School of Design to address these issues and more. The course will be directed toward design professionals, environmentalists, educators, facilities managers, graduate students and others with an interest in sustainable architecture. Randy will be joined by Jose Alminana, a principal with Andropogon Associates in Philadelphia, PA.

The course will provide both a historic overview and a participatory critique of green architecture models and will address the pressing questions surrounding these issues in current practice.

To read more about the course and how to register for future courses, please visit:
Harvard Graduate School of Design



Croxton Collaborative's Sustainable Retrofit for Willingboro Public Library featured in November-December 2011 Issue of GreenSource Magazine

Croxton Collaborative Architects' sustainable master plan and public library rehabilitation for Willingboro, New Jersey were the key feature for GreenSource Magazine's Retrofitting Suburbia article in the magazine's November-December 2011 issue. The article, which was written by Katharine Logan, is part of GreenSource's CEU feature (after finishing, readers can take a CEU quiz for AIA and GBCI learning credits) and focuses heavily on Willingboro, NJ.

As one of three original Levittowns, Willingboro is the perfect example of, in the author's words, the 'post-World War II [suburb], spurred by federal mortgage incentives and a culture going car-crazy'. Conversely, the sustainable rehabilitation plan developed by Croxton Collaorative, which won multiple design and sustainability awards, including the AIA National Committee on the Environment Award, the nation's highest sustainable design award, 'enabled density and security.' Further 'Of 380,000 square feet of structure existing at the project's outset, 230,000 square feet are now serving new function.'

The library uses the structural steel frame and concrete foundations of the original building, a Woolworth's store. Daylighting is the library's defining strategy; the building envelope incorporates multiple clerestory windows and major skylights. The clerestories, which run along the north-south axis, cross with existing structural beams, achieving 95% diffuse light with transitory dappled light effects. Although the library was built at market-rate, the project team relied on energy modeling and whole-system integration to improve the building's energy efficiency. The building was designed to achieve a 57% reduction in peak electrical demand, a 44% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, and a 46% reduction in energy costs-compared with a comparable, conventional building - yielding an anticipated 5.5-year payback period.

To read the article online, please visit: GreenSource Magazine

To read more details about the project's sustainable design innovations, please visit the AIA Committee on the Environment.

Bryant School Redevelopment and Iredale Mineral Cosmetics
Lauded by White House

In their efforts to highlight the essential contributions of small businesses to our country's economic success, members of President Obama's team have featured Iredale Mineral Cosmetics as a model for smart growth and reinvestment. A key element of this growth and reinvestment that was discussed by Jane Iredale, the company's founder and president, is the Croxton Collaborative led redevelopment of the Bryant School building to serve as the company's new global headquarters.

The 17,700 sf, 111-year-old school building, a treasured local landmark, will be thoughtfully repurposed to a high-performance office building which will serve as the new international headquarters for IMC. The project reflects many of the shared values between IMC and CCA such as environmental sustainability and architectural responsiveness to human health and the environment. From the beginning of this process, the project team has been attuned to the restorative potentials of a more deeply considered architecture and how the new facility’s presence in an existing school building in a vacated educational development will foster and re-build a place of community in an emerging area in the downtown neighborhood.

The restorative power of the project was also recognized by the state and federal officials. The State of Massachusetts, through MassDevelopment, issued a $4.6 million Recovery Zone Facility Bond as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that will help fund the sustainable rehabilitation of the Bryant School.

As with all projects undertaken by CCA, sustainable, innovative and resourceful design solutions will be at the heart of the Bryant School project. It is being designed to achieve a minimum of LEED Gold certification while preserving the historic elements that are so beloved by the local community. The project will feature several rain gardens to naturally capture and filter stormwater and prevent runoff into the neighboring Housatonic River.

To read more about Iredale Mineral Cosmetics and the Bryant School Redevelopment, please visit: The White House Blog


Kirsten Childs Receives ASID’s Highest Honor

Kirsten Childs, Director of Facilities Planning and Interior Design at Croxton Collaborative Architects since 1985, has been honored as the 2010 Designer of Distinction by the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) for her lifetime of contributions to the profession of interior design and to the field of sustainable design. The recognition is the highest honor that ASID bestows on one of its members.

Kirsten served on the US Green Building Council’s LEED Steering Committee for four years, and has been intensely involved with the development of the LEED building rating programs. A founding member of LEED for Commercial Interiors (CI), she also chaired the Environmental Quality Technical Advisory Group for all LEED rating systems through 2004. Kirsten was also a volunteer on the American Society of Interior Designers ‘Sustainable Design Council’ for five years, and has represented ASID at multiple symposia, including ‘The Greening of the White House. She has been an integral part of the growth of sustainable design.

Early to recognize the impact of the built environment on the natural environment, Kirsten played a key role in developing Croxton Collaborative’s sustainable design agenda. In 1989, she directed the design team for the award-winning Natural Resources Defense Council, recognized as the seminal sustainable project and the cornerstone for many initiatives that characterize the field. Ms. Childs’ work in sustainable design has been recognized nationally and internationally, resulting in invitations to speak and teach in multiple venues, including the Royal Institute of Technology in Melbourne as well as Sydney University, Australia, the French government in Pas de Calais, France, and most recently the Qatar Foundation in the Persian Gulf country of Qatar.

To read more about the honor, please visit:
ASID Award Winners 2010


NRDC Headquarters Expansion Prototype Featured In GreenSource Magazine

The recently completed Office Expansion Prototype at NRDC’s New York City Headquarters has been featured in GreenSource Magazine in an article aptly titled ‘Let There Be Daylight.’ The project, the most recent chapter in the 25-year collaboration between Croxton Collaborative Architects and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), creates a more sustainable, flexible universal office plan that increases occupant density while improving well-being. And, with 51 of 59 points achieved on its recent LEED-CI Platinum certification, it has received the highest LEED-CI rating ever!

Focusing on both groups’ emphasis on resourcefulness the project was one of the first on the East Coast to utilize Integrated Project Delivery (IPD). The resulting project was 7.5% under budget and had only 2 change orders.

Energy efficiency was a key project goal. A high efficiency HVAC unit was installed, the lighting design was tuned to minimize energy usage (31% more efficient than code) while maintaining productive light levels, and a thermal upgrade/retrofit was performed via environmentally benign insulation plus high performance glazing. Daylight was maximized through optimized ceiling geometries, highly reflective surfaces, dual-zone daylighting control and incorporating a daylight responsive continuous dimming system. Energy modeling confirms 32% more energy efficiency than required by code.

Indoor air quality (IAQ) was thoroughly addressed by the specification of low/no VOC materials, materials with no added urea formaldehyde, low emitting carpet, and high efficiency filtration of ventilation air. Post-construction IAQ testing confirmed contaminant concentrations orders of magnitude below USGBC ‘green’ thresholds for good indoor air quality.

To read the article online, please visit:
GreenSource July-August 2011

Click here to download a digital version of the article.


Randy Croxton Leads Executive Education Seminar at Harvard

The cover pages of Architectural Record and Architecture Magazine for January 2011 shouted out in bold text, "WHAT NOW?" "WHAT NEXT?" Given the widespread criticisms of high-style/low-substance architecture as well as the failure of green models/codes to fully deliver as hoped, now is the time to reinforce the green strategies that are working, raise the priority of the performance fundamentals that are currently optional, and create a coherent sustainably informed road map going forward. In short, create architecture more clearly aligned with the community being served and deliver design excellence that embodies more resourceful and meaningful outcomes.

While models of green architecture performance have had success in raising awareness and changing the marketplace for the better (USGBC's LEED program being the foremost example), there is an increasing demand for higher energy performance, robust materials screening, and a dramatically more resourceful architecture, landscape, and community. New sustainability models have emerged that incorporate a range of next generation attributes, including specific community and urban contexts, wayfinding, infrastructure, outdoor environmental comfort, and sustainable-transition planning to reach 100 percent renewable energy and net zero energy. The key to remaining competitive as a firm or learning organization, attracting grant funding, and keeping a project current over the typically multiyear process of design and construction is to participate in the evolution of the field and understand how future expectations are already shaping the market.

For the seventeenth consecutive year, Randy Croxton led an executive education seminar at the Harvard Graduate School of Design to address these issues and more. The course was directed toward design professionals, environmentalists, educators, facilities managers, graduate students and others with an interest in sustainable architecture. Randy was joined by Nadav Malin, the president of BuildingGreen, Inc., and Michael Gulich, AIA, vice president of Croxton Collaborative Architects.

The course provided both a historic overview and a participatory critique of green architecture models and addressed the pressing questions surrounding these issues in current practice.

To read more about the course and how to register for future courses, please visit:
Harvard Graduate School of Design


Fordham Place is Bronx’s First Commercial LEED®-CS Project

Fordham Place, a 276,000-square-foot, mixed-use retail and office complex at the intersection of East Fordham Road and Webster Avenue in the Bronx, has achieved LEED Gold certification under the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® for Core & Shell™ green building certification program.

The sustainable design and LEED certification efforts for the project were led by Croxton Collaborative Architects, the project’s Coordinating Architects for Sustainability, who worked in collaboration with the Executive Architects, GreenbergFarrow. Fordham Place marks yet another professional first in Croxton Collaborative’s list of LEED and sustainable design exemplar projects. The firm also achieved the first LEED Gold Academic Building in NY State with St. Lawrence University’s Johnson Hall in 2008.

Croxton Collaborative incorporated a number of energy efficiency technologies into the design of Fordham Place to optimize the energy performance of the entire building. These measures include a high performance central chiller plant with ice storage which significantly reduces peak electrical demand, a thermally upgraded building envelope (walls, roof, glazing), a high performance boiler plant, and a coordinated BMS (building management system). Collectively these strategies have the effect of significantly reducing energy usage allowing Fordham Place to achieve all 8 LEED points for optimized energy performance.

A major contributor to the success of the project, and the team’s ability to pursue such a high level of sustainable design excellence was the significant amount of funding the project received from the New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA). Altogether, NYSERDA granted the project over $540,000 for building systems upgrades, energy modeling, green building analysis and commissioning.

To read more about Fordham Place, please visit:
Acadia Realty Trust


Randy Croxton's "A Call for Resourceful Architecture"
Featured in Inaugural Issue of Pratt's Strategic Design Review

Pratt Institute launched CATALYST Strategic Design Review, a digital publication of the graduate Design Management Program, designed to encourage a conversation about the role of strategic design in shaping long-term business advantage and a sustainable future. The intent of CATALYST is to provide an opportunity for design leaders and innovators to share the theory, practice and excitement of designing triple bottom line strategic advantage.

The inaugural issue explores New York City as an incubator for evolving triple bottom line thinking (corporate, environmental and social strategy) into a holistic methodology and features "A Call for Resourceful Architecture" by Randy Croxton. In the article, Randy addresses the need to move forward in sustainable design and accomplish sustainability with "no net green premium." The article takes as a case study Johnson Hall of Science at St. Lawrence University, which achieved a LEED Gold rating (the first academic or laboratory building in New York State to do so) at a construction cost 30% below the regional benchmark for this building type.

Click here to download a digital version of the article.